Chapter 1 Philippians with Dr. J. Vernon McGee.  KEY: The epistle is practical; its key thought is joy. It has been labeled  “The Secret of Joy.” Some form of the word occurs 19 times. It answers the question, “How may I have joy in my heart?”  The man who wrote, “Rejoice in the Lord always; and again I say, Rejoice”  (Philippians 4:4), was in the Mamertine prison in Rome. Joy does not depend upon circumstances.  “Joy” — this is the first of 19 occurrences of this word or its cognates. Joy is the fruit of the Spirit, and it was not turned off when Paul went to prison.  Notes & Audio links provided.  “Get the Word of God out”  Complete Pdf notes & outline at bottom of article.  

NOTES & AUDIO

Philippians Chapter 1

OUTLINE:

I. PHILOSOPHY for Christian living, Chapter 1

A. Introduction, vv. 1, 2

B. Paul’s tender feeling for the Philippians, vv. 3-11

C. Bonds and afflictions further the gospel, vv. 12-20

D. In life or death — Christ, vv. 21-30

 

COMMENT:

I. PHILOSOPHY for Christian living, Chapter 1

A. Introduction, vv. 1, 2

v. 1 — In ascribing this epistle to himself, Paul links his name with that of Timothy. Since there is no doctrine to correct or conduct to condemn, Paul does not assert his apostleship, but identifies himself with Timothy as “servants [bond slaves] of Jesus Christ.”

“All the saints” — apparently there is one ripple on the surface of the church: two women, Syntyche and Euodia, are not of the same mind (Philippians 4:2). Paul is careful not to address either one or the leader of a group.

The saints are “in” Christ, but they are “at” Philippi.

He is addressing a local church with officers: bishops — the office elders — the individuals deacons — spiritual men performing a secular service

(Acts 6)

v. 2 — “Grace” (charis) is the Greek form of greeting; “peace”

(shalom) is the Hebrew greeting. We must know the grace of God before we can experience the peace of God. Grace is love in action.

B. Paul’s tender feeling for the Philippians, vv. 3-11

v. 3 — It is a lovely and delightful relationship.

v. 4 — Paul prays for the Philippians in every prayer. “You all” is

not only a good Southern idiom, but it includes all the saints in Philippi

— none are left out.

“Joy” — this is the first of 19 occurrences of this word or its cognates. Joy is the fruit of the Spirit, and it was not turned off when Paul went to prison.

v. 5 — “Fellowship” is koinonia. Anything that believers can share together is koinonia — fellowship. Prayer, Bible reading, celebrating the Lord’s Supper, and giving are all areas of fellowship that can be shared.

v. 6 — “Being confident” is causative, meaning “since I am confident,” implying certainty.

“Perform” (perfect) is translated “will finish it up” (Lenski) or “carry through” (Vincent).

“Day of Jesus Christ” is the Rapture.

If God has brought you up to the present hour, He will consummate His work in you. He will not let you down. You can count on Him. (This has been my personal life verse from the day I graduated from college.)

v. 7 — “Meet” (KJV) is right. “You all” — here it is again.

“In my heart” is a good place to carry friends.

“Partakers” (sugkoinonous) is fellowship compounded. This speaks of the close relationship between the Philippians and Paul. There is no credibility gap.

v. 8 — “You all” includes all believers in the church, not just one segment.

“Bowels” (KJV) means tender feelings. This has definite reference to the emotions and drives. Here is where many decisions are made —not in the mind.

v. 9 — Love of the believer is to be exercised in knowledge. He is not to express his love and help to any and every person in sight. He should know the individual and then exercise judgment. He does not love indiscriminately.

v. 10 — “That ye may approve things that are excellent” may rather be expressed, “That ye may try the things that differ.”

“Without offense” is blameless.

C. Bonds and afflictions further the gospel, vv. 12-20

v. 12 — Obviously, the Philippians had sent their sympathy to Paul, expressing their distress that his imprisonment had ended the preaching of the gospel. Paul makes it clear that, rather, the gospel is being extended by his imprisonment. He mentions two areas, and we see another, also:

v. 13 — (1) Paul is now able to witness to the Praetorian guard of Caesar’s palace. These soldiers, representing the elite of Roman patricians, were guarding the apostle (Acts 28:16).

v. 14 — (2) Many believers who felt inadequate as long as Paul was out witnessing now feel free to go. I suppose literally hundreds of believers took to the Roman roads with the gospel.

(3) Paul does not mention it, but with the perspective of history we see that the Spirit of God was giving Paul the time to write these prison epistles.

vv. 15-18 — Some brethren who preached Christ were of goodwill, but others, motivated by envy and jealousy, were giving Paul a rough time. In either case, he rejoiced that Christ was being preached.

v. 19 — “Salvation” evidently refers here to Paul’s physical deliverance.

v. 20 — Paul’s motivation is that Christ shall be magnified in his body either in life or death.

D. In life or death — Christ, vv. 21-30

v. 21 — This is Paul’s philosophy of life:

To live — Christ;

To die — gain (more of the same thing).

vv. 22-26 — Paul recognizes that to be with Christ is far better, but for the Philippians’ sake it is better to continue on with them.

v. 27 — Regardless of his presence, Paul urges them to continue living in a manner that is honoring to Christ.

v. 28 — He also urges them not to be terrified by their enemies.

v. 29 — Suffering is the badge of the child of God. (With the use of a concordance, look up the Scripture references to the suffering of the saints, beginning with John 16:33).

Philippians (75.5 mb) Download entire Commentary here.

https://amos37.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/no38_philippians-2.pdf

 

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